WIGMORE CASTLE

Herefordshire

Wigmore Castle, Herefordshire

Wigmore is one of Herefordshire's typically ruinous but once large Castles. The first Castle was constructed by William FitzObern around 1067-1070.  In 1075 it was granted to Ralph Mortimer, and the family owned the Castle until 1425.

In 1155 the Castle was captured by Henry II from Hugh de Mortimer, and forces loyal to Richard I captured the Castle from Hugh's son, Roger, when he supported Prince John's rebellion. It is likely that by the time of the second siege the Castle existed in stone. Yet another attack came during the de Montfort rebellion. In 1265 the Castle was a refuge for Prince Edward, fleeing from the battle at Hereford.

Most of the stone remains, which follow a more-or-less motte and bailey plan, which we are left with today date from the early 1300s when the Castle was rebuilt by Roger de Mortimer IV. During the turmoil of Edward II's reign, Mortimer was against the King and was forced to flee from the country.  He returned with Queen Isabella and Edward II was deposed (and subsequently brutally murdered in Berkeley Castle, Gloucestershire). Isabella and Roger de Mortimer reigned in the name of the boy Edward III - who (rather ungratefully) when he came of age had Roger arrested and executed for treason against his father!

The Castle passed through a series of high-profile owners, but slowly lost its importance to nearby Ludlow Castle. In 1642 the fortifications were dismantled by Sir Robert Harley of Brampton Bryan Castle and the Castle was allowed to fall into the ruinous state we have today.

The Castle is on public ground and accessible at all times.

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© Text copyright - Raving Loony Productions, Andrew J. Müller and Roy Barton
© Photos and Artwork - Andrew J. Müller and Roy Barton
© Web Design and Layout - Andrew J. Müller
2011


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